University of Virginia, Department of Computer Science
CS588: Cryptology - Principles and Applications, Fall 2001

Manifest: Wednesday 29 August 2001
Assignments Due
Friday, 31 August (noon) Problem Set 0 (Registration Survey)
Monday, 10 SeptemberProblem Set 1

Mailing Lists
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Readings

Read before 3 September:

Cryptogram
XBW HGQW XS ACFPSUWG FWPGWXF CF AWWKZV CDQGJCDWA CD BHYJD DJXHGW; WUWD XBW ZWJFX PHGCSHF YCDA CF GSHFWA LV XBW KGSYCFW SI FBJGCDQ RDSOZWAQW OCXBBWZA IGSY SXBWGF.
Questions
There is a remarkably close parallel between the problems of the physicist and those of the cryptographer. The system on which a message is enciphered corresponds to the laws of the universe, the intercepted messages to the evidence available, the keys for a day or a message to important constants which have yet to be determined. The correspondence is very close, but the subject matter of cryptography is very easily dealt with by discrete machinery, physics not so easily.

Alan Turing


CS 655 University of Virginia
Department of Computer Science
CS 588: Cryptology - Principles and Applications
David Evans
evans@cs.virginia.edu