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Courses


Here are the courses being taught in the area of computer graphics:

Fall 2004

CS 445/645 - Intro Graphics
This course introduces techniques for 2D and 3D computer graphics, including modeling and representation, illumination and shading, rendering, texturing, and advanced software tools. The student will learn fundamental algorithms and techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to understand and augment the latest innovations in computer graphics.

CS 851 - Modern Research in Computer Graphics
We will look at a variety of topics in modern computer graphics research. Students will be expected to read and present research papers.

CS 440 - Computer Graphics for Film Production
This interdisciplinary course will bring together students and concepts from computer science, architecture, media studies, music, and the visual and performing arts. Working in small teams that span these disciplines, and using state-of-the-art production software, students will propose, storyboard, film, animate, and edit short video segments incorporating three-dimensional computer generated visual effects. The course will culminate in a public presentation of student videos.

Spring 2004

CS 446 - Real-Time Rendering
This course examines real-time rendering of high-quality interactive graphics. Applications such as video games, simulators, and virtual reality have recently become capable of near cinematic-quality visuals at real-time rates. Students study the advances in graphics hardware and algorithms that are making this possible, including non-photorealistic rendering, occlusion culling, level of detail, terrain rendering, shadow generation, image-based rendering, and physical simulation.  As part of a semester-long team project, students build a 3D video game with individual assignments that showcase the various real-time rendering techniques employed by a modern game engine.

CS 445/645 - Intro Graphics
This course introduces techniques for 2D and 3D computer graphics, including modeling and representation, illumination and shading, rendering, texturing, and advanced software tools. The student will learn fundamental algorithms and techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to understand and augment the latest innovations in computer graphics.

CS 851 - Modern Research in Computer Graphics
[This course continues from the previous semester.]  We will look at a variety of topics in modern computer graphics research. Students will be expected to read and present research papers.

Fall 2003

CS 445/645 - Intro Graphics
This course introduces techniques for 2D and 3D computer graphics, including modeling and representation, illumination and shading, rendering, texturing, and advanced software tools. The student will learn fundamental algorithms and techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to understand and augment the latest innovations in computer graphics.

CS 551/651 - Animation
This course introduces both fundamental and advanced computer animation techniques. The course will follow both lecture and seminar formats, requiring students to prepare paper presentations and lead discussions. Such traditional animation topics as keyframing, procedural algorithms, camera control, and scene composition will be discussed. The course will also introduce modern research techniques covering dynamic simulation, motion capture, and feedback control algorithms. These topics will help prepare students for careers as technical directors in the computer animation industry and will assist students pursuing research careers.

CS 851 - Modern Research in Computer Graphics
This course will look at a variety of topics in modern computer graphics research. Students will be expected to read and present research papers.

Spring 2003

CS 445/645 - Intro Graphics
This course introduces techniques for 2D and 3D computer graphics, including modeling and representation, illumination and shading, rendering, texturing, and advanced software tools. The student will learn fundamental algorithms and techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to understand and augment the latest innovations in computer graphics.

CS 447/647 - Image Synthesis
This course provides a broad overview of the theory and practice of rendering. We will discuss classic rendering algorithms, however most of the course will focus on either fundamentals of image synthesis or current methods for physically based rendering.

CS 851-2 - Interactive Ray Tracing
In this seminar we will explore the literature of this very young branch of computer graphics. We will discuss the "how" of interactive ray tracing: the developments in hardware and algorithms that have made this possible. We will also address the more important question of "why": what, if anything, does interactive ray tracing offer over the extremely sophisticated and powerful polygonal rendering hardware that has been developed over the past twenty years? What novel rendering strategies does real-time ray tracing enable over what was previously possible? Can ray tracing usefully augment production real-time rendering systems such as games?

Fall 2002

CS 445/645 - Introduction to Computer Graphics
This course introduces techniques for 2D and 3D computer graphics, including modeling and representation, illumination and shading, rendering, texturing, and advanced software tools. Students learn fundamental algorithms and techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to understand and augment the latest innovations in computer graphics.

CS 551/651 - Real-Time Rendering
This course examines real-time rendering of high-quality interactive graphics. Applications such as video games, simulators, and virtual reality have recently become capable of near cinematic-quality visuals at real-time rates. Students study the advances in graphics hardware and algorithms that are making this possible, including non-photorealistic rendering, occlusion culling, level of detail, terrain rendering, shadow generation, image-based rendering, and physical simulation.

CS 551/851 - Big Data in Computer Graphics
This course covers a variety of issues that arise when trying to interact with or visualize big datasets. The definition of "big" always varies with the application, but similar issues arise again and again, such as bandwidth constraints, latency requirements, scalability limits, parallel load balancing, visual fidelity, and output device characteristics. These issues are particularly critical when it is important to build a system that is interactive. In this class, students look at recent research results related to these topics. The focus is on scalable systems, but the use of levels of detail, tone mapping, alternate rendering architectures and other topics are also covered.

Spring 2002

CS 551/851 - Advanced Computer Graphics and Animation
This course introduces both fundamental and advanced computer animation techniques. The course will follow the format of a seminar, in which students will prepare paper presentations and lead discussions. Such traditional animation topics as keyframing, procedural algorithms, camera control, and scene composition will be discussed. The course will also introduce modern research techniques covering dynamic simulation, motion capture, and feedback control algorithms. These topics will help prepare students for careers as technical directors in the computer animation industry and will assist students pursuing research careers.

Fall 2001

CS 445/645 - Introduction to Computer Graphics
This course introduces techniques for 2D and 3D computer graphics, including modeling and representation, illumination and shading, rendering, texturing, and advanced software tools. Students learn fundamental algorithms and techniques and gain the knowledge necessary to understand and augment the latest innovations in computer graphics.

CS 446 - 3D Animation and Special Effects
This interdisciplinary course brings together students and concepts from computer science, architecture, digital media, music, and the visual and performing arts. Working in small teams that span these disciplines, students propose, storyboard, film, animate, and edit short video segments incorporating three-dimensional computer generated visual effects. The course culminates in a public presentation of student videos on HooVision (that huge videoboard in Scott Stadium).

Copyright 2004 by the University of Virginia Department of Computer Science
151 Engineer's Way, P.O. Box 400740 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4740
E-mail: graphics@cs.virginia.edu Telephone: 434.982.2200 Fax: 434.982.2214