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Ping

To ping a machine (test whether it is on the network):

1. Open a command prompt. For Windows, click "Start", then "Run..." Type "command" in the dialog box that opens, then press Enter.

2. Type "ping" (without quotes), followed by the name of the machine you wish to ping. Hit enter.

Normal output from the ping command:

K:\>ping eirene

Pinging eirene.cs.virginia.edu [128.143.136.16] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 128.143.136.16: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 128.143.136.16: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 128.143.136.16: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 128.143.136.16: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 128.143.136.16:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

This output indicates that eirene was online at the time of my ping.

Other ping options:

K:\>ping /?

Usage: ping [-t] [-a] [-n count] [-l size] [-f] [-i TTL] [-v TOS]
[-r count] [-s count] [[-j host-list] | [-k host-list]]
[-w timeout] destination-list

Options:
-t Ping the specified host until stopped.
   To see statistics and continue - type Control-Break;
   To stop - type Control-C.
-a Resolve addresses to hostnames.
-n count Number of echo requests to send.
-l size Send buffer size.
-f Set Don't Fragment flag in packet.
-i TTL Time to Live.
-v TOS Type of Service.
-r count Record route for count hops.
-s count Timestamp for count hops.
-j host-list Loose source route along host-list.
-k host-list Strict source route along host-list.
-w timeout Timeout in milliseconds to wait for each reply.